Forum Replies Created

Viewing 5 posts - 1 through 5 (of 5 total)
  • Author
    Posts
  • m.phakisi
    Participant
    Post count: 5

    The Lesokoana game played is said to symbolise women from different villages coming together in a form of play to pray for rain. The teacher along with students would make videos of different women from different villages while talking about the significance of this game and role played by women in solving village problems. Then they can analyse the collected videos to find the similarities and differences of ideas from different villages with different values. In this way students learn to critically look at the information at hand. Son from these they will learn about the importance of “matsema” joined ventures Basotho used to combat the problems they face.

    m.phakisi
    Participant
    Post count: 5

    How would you work with students to mobilise stories and cultural heritage on a specific local SD issue or matter of concern (e.g. water pollution, waste, community health, energy, food security, safety of girl children etc.)?
    How would you approach the matter of concern with a systems view? And how can this inform a participatory local inquiry into the matter of concern to understand it better? How would you do this with your students?
    Issue of concern: mitigating effects of climate
    In Lesotho when there is a drought community arrange “lesokoana” a game where girls and young women from one village go to another village to steal the stirring stick and the females from that villagers would respond by chasing them out of their village. Its stories like this that students can research to get inside into their origin and try to find their relationship to rainfall. Then from the story and all the information they can collect my students will brainstorm how they can use lesokoana story as a starting point to ways of mitigating the effects of climate change such as floods and soil erosion.

    How would you assess progress in relation to the learning and the co-engaged, inquiry centred approach?
    By use of rubric or problem based learning with aspects of an issue and methods used to mitigate it

    m.phakisi
    Participant
    Post count: 5

    a) what is known about a topic
    Our curriculum covers pollution, its effect and how it can be reduced. These topic therefore will include causes of global warming and how it can lead to climate change. These are the concepts that are taught to the learners. In development studies the curriculum covers about treaties, summits and protocols that were meant to mitigate climate change.

    (b) what is not yet known about a topic (in this case, climate change in Southern Africa) The documented extent of climate change in Africa and Lesotho in particular and how we can address the issue using our indigenous know2ledge systems

    m.phakisi
    Participant
    Post count: 5

    Cross cutting issues that are affecting Lesotho are food production and land remaining uncultivated. With every passing year there is a gradual decrease in the amount of crops farmers reap from their fields and increase in arable land that is not farmed due to climate change and poverty. This is also accompanied by loss of soil fertility. Lately the scourge of covid 19 has brought another issue of health concerns.
    How to address these issues in our curriculum: By going back to our roots by use ofstudents finding the indigenous knowledge knowledge on traditional seeds that can be regrown year after year because many farmers cannot afford to buy seeds and fertilizers.That says the curriculum should include practical indigenous ways of farming

    m.phakisi
    Participant
    Post count: 5

    a) what is known about a topic
    Climate change: In my pure science department course in Biology and Chemistry the concept of pollution and its effect including climate change are cross-cutting. However, reflecting on what is being taught I realise that its been so cut and dried according to what the textbooks says. Even the District school debates that are run by schools annually where students talk about climate change there is not much out of what is commonly known.
    b) what is not yet known about a topic (in this case, climate change in Southern Africa).
    I think We have not really taken it out of the classroom, into the communities where we talk about this with the village elders so they can tell us their stories so our students see climate change and its progress through the lens of our own context.

Viewing 5 posts - 1 through 5 (of 5 total)